Posts Tagged ‘LOST’

Back in 2009, Michael Emerson did an interview for the Jacksonville Magazine. You can see the result in the Michael Emerson Photo Gallery. Here’s the teaser:

Click here to view the larger version.

Emmy-winning actor Michael Emerson has performed on Broadway with Paul Giamatti and Kevin Spacey, appeared in the top-grossing horror film franchise of all time and currently stars on an ABC drama that Time magazine named one of the 100 best shows of all time (he won the Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for The Practice, by the way). And he has Jacksonville to thank. Emerson moved to Jacksonville by way of New York City in the mid-’80s and quickly got involved in the arts community.He acted in a number of productions at Theatre Jacksonville and served as its technical director of theater. He also taught drawing at Flagler College in St. Augustine. “I had a good life in Jacksonville,” he says of his six years in the River City, “and found myself as an actor.” These days, Emerson and his wife, Carrie, are “tri-coastal,” living in New York and Los Angeles for seven months and Hawaii when he’s shooting Lost. But he’ll always have a place in his heart for Northeast Florida.

1. Saw was the most dangerous shoot I’ve ever been on, and I was glad to escape with only minor injuries. I had cracked ribs, lumps, bruises and scrapes all over me. I couldn’t sleep on my right side for weeks.

2. I played a Polynesian witch doctor in the fifth grade play. My first Jacksonville role was Iago in Othello at UNF.

3. Nothing makes me more nervous than public speaking (as myself). Talk shows? … Terrifying!

4. I have worked as a landscaper, carpenter, painter, shipping clerk, teacher, designer and director—but only waited tables once. I lasted three hours in the dining room of the Des Moines Country Club before I poured coffee on a lady. I wasn’t asked back.

5. People understand (in their rational minds, at least) that I am not really the character I play on Lost. But some of them are cautious around me, behaving rather formally and keeping a safe distance.

6. I always wanted to be an archaeologist. Still do. I like archaeology because I am a person oriented toward the past and because it is a kind of detective.

7. Director Sam Raimi gave away the part I was playing in the film For the Love of the Game to his brother.

8. I’ve never been very comfortable with guns— never held one in my life except in front of a camera.Strangely, I’ve carried guns in almost every role I’ve played in movies and TV. Hell, you can’t ask someone to pass the salt on Lost without drawing a gun!

9. I learned to act for the camera by doing training films for the U.S. government in Brunswick, Georgia.

10. Sixteen years later, I still have a storage unit in Jacksonville, which contains 500 vintage Lps, all of my graduate school papers and original sketches from my life as an illustrator, and an assortment of canes, swords, wigs and trophies from my North Florida theater days. I never had an apartment with enough space to keep them, but this year I’ll finally empty it out. I think.

I found this article here. I would have loved to hear the radio show. Maybe it will be available in a podcast form sometime in the future.

20 Questions with Michael Emerson

Posted 05.15.2015

20 Questions With Cultural Creatives

Brought to you by MoreArtCulture

This week, a very special “Up North” edition featuring Emmy-winning actor Michael Emerson. Currently starring in “Person of Interest” on CBS, Emerson is a successful and recognizable talent both on screen and on stage; including roles in the hit series “LOST,” “The Practice,” and “Without a Trace” on television and Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar WildeThe Iceman Cometh, and Hedda Gabbler on Broadway.

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Originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Emerson graduated from Drake University with a degree in Theater in 1976 and moved to New York City where he worked as a magazine illustrator for many years. It was a relocation to Jacksonville which revived his interest in acting and he pursued it as a career in the South during the late ‘80s and early ‘90s.

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It was during that period the Emerson met local theatre creative Ian Mairs, and the two became instant friends and collaborators. The two teamed up once again for Swamp Radio‘s “Up North” episode, which you can listen to on WJCT 89.9 FM on Friday, May 22nd at 7:00 p.m. In the episode, Emerson reads a piece entitled “Pascagoula” by Michael Carroll, a childhood friend of Mairs originally from Arlington. “Ian is a big fan of Michael’s short stories,” Emerson told us. “He showed them to me and I thought they were extraordinary— plainly, almost serenely told with a fine wit, keen observation, a powerful sense of place and a carefully understated sense of heartache as a life-companion. He has the ability to take your breath away with a sudden interruption or twist of plot.”

Emerson as Valmont in "Les Liaisons Dangereuse" at Theatre Jacksonville.Emerson as Valmont in “Les Liaisons Dangereuse” at Theatre Jacksonville.

1. Where are you from originally?
I grew up in a very small town in Iowa.

2. Where do you live now?
My wife and I divide our time between New York City and Los Angeles.

3. What connects you to Jacksonville?
I don’t have the connections I once had in Jacksonville although my good friend Ian Mairs continues to be a force in the arts community there. St. Augustine was a true artistic home for me and I have dear friends there and think of it all the time.

4. What’s a city everyone in Jax should visit in order to experience their arts + culture?
I do think it is inspiring, or at least informative, to visit the culture capitals of the world (New York, Paris, Tokyo, etc.) but I get excited about cities in the USA that have particular characters— places like Charleston, New Orleans, San Francisco, Austin and so forth.

5. What are you most proud of so far, career or artistic-wise?
I’m proud of my Midwestern roots, my college degrees, some drawings and teaching I’ve done, my good fortune in marriage, much of my work in the Theater and my unexpected TV career.

Emerson in New York City.Emerson in New York City.

6. Favorite neighborhood in Jax?
San Marco, where I lived for several years, and Five Points, where there were fun things to do in those days.

7. What’s a great exhibition, show, or cultural event you enjoyed this past year?
I was stunned by the Matisse show of cut-paper work at the Museum of Modern Art and the Native American Art exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum. In the theater I was impressed by FUN HOME on Broadway and the interactive theater piece THEN SHE FELL. I saw the Italian film THE GREAT BEAUTY late but can’t stop thinking about it and I adore the cabaret artists THE SKIVVIES.

8. If you could steal something from another city and bring it to Jax, what would it be?
I would steal a busy downtown nightlife. I mean it.

9. Why did you choose to read Carroll’s “Pascagoula” for the Swamp Radio “Up North” episode?
Ian asked me to choose one of the stories to record and I didn’t have to think long because I already had a favorite, Pascagoula, and it was a manageable length. It’s one of those great stories in which nothing much happens except that happiness and hopelessness are balanced and accepted. The narrator’s voice is very particular and it was hard to find the right sound for the story. He is wry and understated, almost bemused, carrying as graciously as possible the weight of too many sadnesses and too many disappointments. In short, a neutral tone, dispassionate and nonjudgmental. At peace. I like the speaker very much and I like the way he sees the world. And the North Florida details are perfect— no good story gets very far without conjuring a real world and Mr. Carroll can do it like few others.

10. What would people be surprised to learn about you?
There can’t be much that is unknown about me except my insecurities and my domestic obsessions.

Emerson as Romeo in "Romeo and Juliet" at Shakespeare in the Park, Metropolitan Park.Emerson as Romeo in “Romeo and Juliet” at Shakespeare in the Park, Metropolitan Park.

11. What’s your signature?
An increasingly wobbly scrawl but I do attempt to make all the letters.

12. How do you get “in the zone?”
Terror and discipline are instinctive motives for me now and the “zone” is more accessible with each passing year.

13. Where can people find your work?
TV, YouTube, old periodicals.

14. Can you tell us something people don’t know about becoming a working artist?
It is an exhausted subject, I think, but patience and a kind of artistic privacy are important for sure. It has been useful for me to remind myself that a career in show business is not a race.

15. What would you most like to see change in Jax?
More pedestrians, more nightlife, more fashion, more eccentricity.

Emerson in "Person of Interest" on CBS.Emerson in “Person of Interest” on CBS.

16. What’s a favorite production you were involved with in Jax?
I was proud of my Shakespeare work with Pam Hanks at UNF and a production of Tennessee William’s OUTCRY with Cynthia Kimball at River City Playhouse. I directed a production I’ll never forget of LAUGHING WILD with Ian Mairs and Valerie Anthony and a nice TWELFTH NIGHT at Shakespeare in the Park. (If anyone remembers such a thing.)

17. It’s a Friday night – where are we most likely to find you?
On Friday nights I’m either filming, dining or at the theater. (And of course there is a dog to be walked.)

18. What would you write as an epitaph on your tombstone?
My epitaph will say “Actor” and there will be a brief quote from Shakespeare.

19. Where can we follow you on social media?
I think there is a Facebook fan page but I’m not personally connected to social media. It’s all I can manage to answer my emails.

20. What’s up next for you?

There is no end-date for PERSON OF INTEREST yet but when it is over I will have a chance to return to the stage, do some independent film or make a study of birds and plants. And maybe tackle the long books.

Emerson as Brian in "A Day in the Death of Joe Egg" with the Jax Actor's Theatre.Emerson as Brian in “A Day in the Death of Joe Egg” with the Jax Actor’s Theatre.

You can watch Emerson in Person of Interest on CBS Tuesdays at 10/9c, and catch him reading “Pascagoula” as part of Swamp Radio‘s “Up North” episode, Friday, May 22nd at 7:00 p.m. on WJCT 89.9 FM.

Plus – don’t forget to get tickets for the live recording of the next Swamp Radio episode, “How’s Your Summer?” at The Florida Theatre! Friday, June 12th at 8:00 p.m. Special musical guests include The WillowWacks, Herd of Watts, and Mama Blue.



All these photos and more are available in larger forms here and the theatre photos are available here.

If you missed Part 1, here it is:

DarkUFO and SpoilerTV (both maned by the same person) posted an interesting article about a future project for Michael Emerson. I don’t know whether the article was a hoax and was published as an April Fool’s joke (it was published on April 1, 2015) or it was the real deal. If it is the real deal, I am more than happy. I’m megahappy. I’d love to see the LOST characters back together again. So, for your information, here’s the article:

ABC has put in development a spinoff of the landmark series Lost, which ended some 4 years ago. The spinoff, tentatively titled “Lost: Dr. Linus”, is written/executive produced by Elizabeth Sarnoff and directed by veteran Lost director Jack Bender.

The series, which will focus on the adventures of Dr. Linus in the flash-sideways timeline of the final season, is eyeing 8 series regulars. Michael Emerson will lead the ensemble cast, with Tania Raymonde (Alex Rousseau) Daniel Roebuck (Dr. Leslie Artz) and William Atherton (Principal Don Reynolds) also returning. Four new characters have yet to be cast, while former Lost actors Terry O’Quinn, Henry Ian Cusick and Mira Furlan could potentially recur.

I hear the series, which is being eyed for the 2016-17 TV season, will have 15 or 16 episodes per season. That number is in line with that of the latter seasons of Lost, which was a demand from the show’s developers. It comes as no surprise since both worked on the series’ third season, which had 23 episodes and which many fans and critics considered to be the worst season of the show. Therefore, it is only logical that the spinoff will have shorter seasons. All episodes are rumored to have the standard 42-minute length, but supersized finales, which Lost frequently used, are considered likely.

With Emerson currently starring in the CBS series Person of Interest, the project had to be pushed back even though the producers came up with the idea several years ago. But with Person of Interest’s ratings waning, sources close to the series say its all-but guaranteed fifth season is considered to be the last. Should the series continue to run after that, Emerson’s character might be written off the show but it’s far too early to speculate on that.

Of course, Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof never denied that there will not be a revival of the LOST revival. Two years after the finale of LOST, Lindelof was quoted by Digital spy saying that “he believed that LOST would return in some form but that he had no plans to contribute.” Lindelof stated that he and his team told their story and had no desire to “go back.,” but that did not mean that the story could not be retold by another team, or that another team could tell the story of other survivors or other aspects of the the famous surviviro’s lives. In fact, according to Lindelof, Disney owns the franchise and there are great financial possibilities with the franchise, just as StarTrek was a financial gold mine. I, personally, would love to see another angle of the survivor’s story.

Additional source: Screenrant.com

As promised, I found out that there is a new podcast with Michael Emerson. Michael Emerson celebrated his longtime friend’s (Jimmy Aquino) 10th anniversary (600th episode)of his Comic News Insider podcast. Michael appears at around 059:03. Enjoy:

Check out the new additions to the Michael Emerson Photo Gallery:

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The larger version of these photos as well as additional photos can be viewed here.

MICHAEL EMERSON ON LARRY KING LIVE, WATCH AND ENJOY:

Here’s an article that was not placed in this site, but we can find it originally in the mirror site.

By Bryan Alexander

“Lost” fans weren’t the only ones debating and pondering the show’s epic climax in May. So were the very stars of the show, including Michael Emerson. In the days the following the finale, he was trying “to put it all together, to make sense of it all.”

While the finale — like that of any great show — was controversial amongst the critics and the faithful, Emerson was “perfectly satisfied.”

“Lost” Auction Preview: What Can You Bid On?

Profile in History’s Joe Maddalena gives a tour of some of the 1,100 “Lost” items that are going up for auction on August 21 and 22 in Santa Monica, Calif. (Published Tuesday, Mar 4, 2014)

“They delivered the goods,” he says.

The show didn’t answer every question which was fine by Emerson. “I appreciated what was left unsaid or ambiguous,” he says. “I prefer things that are suggested rather than concrete.”

So we took advantage of Emerson speaking to us to promote “Lost: The Complete Sixth Season” and “Lost: The Complete Collection,” which debuts on Blu-ray & DVD on August 24, to explain the ending. It’s his words from here.

In a nutshell. Everything we saw on the island really happened. The plane crashed. We all really lived there. They really had those adventures. But during season 6, there is a change. Everyone on the show is among the newly dead.
And the newly dead hold onto life. They hold onto an idealized vision of the life they lived or that they wished they lived. That’s what everyone is doing in that church. We have leaped forward in time.
After the killing of the smoke monster and the death of Jack and Hurley taking charge — then we move a great distance forward in time. That scene in the church, that is hundreds of years in the future? It doesn’t matter — because in the afterlife time is no longer linear. That is already one of the themes of the show anyways.
So everyone is dead and they are merely waiting for everyone to arrive and be rejoined with their mirror redeemers — that is what I am choosing to call it. That other person from life who loved them so unconditionally that it gave them a license to forgive themselves and thereby be spiritually redeemed. So everyone leaves in pairs. Because it takes two to walk into the afterlife.
Ben doesn’t have a redeemer. That’s why he doesn’t get to go. That’s why he is waiting. Ben is still outside the door. He cannot come in. He says he still has work to do. He has more to make right.

Published at 5:38 AM PST on Aug 20, 2010

Backstage.com has in interesting article about Michael Emerson, who gives good tips on how to go about acting. Heck, it’s good advice for any career. Michael Emerson, you rock!

6 Secrets to Building an Acting Career from Michael Emerson

Theater and screen actor Michael Emerson may have uncovered the mystery to success: There is no right way. “This is one of those tricky businesses where there are a lot of intangibles and a lot of different ways of going about it.” His career may not have taken off until his 40s, but he’s making up for lost time with back-to-back TV hits: first as Ben, the memorable leader of the Others on “Lost,” and now as the mysterious billionaire Harold Finch on “Person of Interest.”

Emerson didn’t want to jump in to just any show after “Lost”—he wanted the right show. So when the pilot he and “Lost” co-star Terry O’Quinn were developing with Bad Robot was put on hold, Emerson was ready to consider other Bad Robot projects. “I didn’t want to jump into anything too soon. I also didn’t want years to go by before I showed my face again.” When he read the script for “Person of Interest,” the intelligent, fast-paced writing, and mysterious, multi-layered, complex characters erased any reservations he may have had about returning to TV.

Emerson shares how to create characters you want to watch and how to navigate career delays.

Training is never a waste.
Emerson says that despite the long road, “I don’t regret a moment of my stage training;” it not only taught him how to create character and deliver lines, but also provided the opportunity to develop a strong work ethic. In Emerson’s mind, the actor’s main responsibility is to deliver the words. “A lot of my work is analyzing, analyzing, analyzing the script, the text I’ve been given, the lines I have to say and thinking how they best work…how they are most real, but also the most stylized or artful.”

Learn to roll with the punches.
With little information to go on for either of his TV shows, Emerson learned to just roll with the story. “In a way it’s better if you’re not too aware of the longer arc or where things are going, because then you might begin to play [in] things prematurely or you might start trying to steer things in certain ways.” So he focuses on staying in the present. “Which is a funny thing to say since I’m on shows that are always bouncing around between the past and the future. That to me, particularly on ‘Lost,’ was the best way for me to negotiate all that inter-dimensionality: flashing forward, sideways, and back all the time.”

Mystery is good.
Emerson has played a number of mysterious characters in his career and his role as Harold on “Person of Interest” is no exception. He likes keeping the emotions hidden in layers. “I really do subscribe to mystery. The actors I like best are those who I just cannot figure out or sometimes I just can’t figure out the way they talk or why they talk that way. It makes me listen.”

Keep the stakes high.
Emerson is a master at intense scenes. “I like scenes where I’m in a very still, small space with someone very dangerous and there’s a bit of cat and mouse going on. We’re trying to read each other but the stakes are terribly high, like playing chess with Enrico Colantoni when he was our villain.”

Leave your comfort zone.
Emerson has excelled in many physical scenes that forced him out of his safety zone, like some of the high-speed car chase scenes and even handling weapons. But ironically, one of his most challenging moments was his first on-screen kiss. Luckily it was with his real-life wife, Carrie Preston, who plays Grace the love of his life (and the one who got away) on the show.

Don’t be desperate.
“The thing to get rid of is that you are the beggar at the gate, that you are the powerless and helpless eager youngster wanting a crumb from the big table,” Emerson says. “It’s a bad mindset and it doesn’t help you to audition well.” Confidence is important: “At some point, you have to empower yourself and say ‘You know what, I’m good at this.’”

Don’t be discouraged by the Chinese introduction. At .34, Michael Emerson and his interviewer, will be chatting in English

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